Dog in self-isolation
19 Mar, 2020

How To Help Your Dog Survive Self-Isolation

Self-isolation can mean that it is impossible to take your dog out for their walk or to play in the park.  Here’s some information on what you need to be thinking about so that you are prepared for your pets’ needs should you find yourself in this situation.

Thankfully, according to the World Organisation For Animal Health, it has been confirmed that there is no evidence of companion animals becoming ill with COVID-19.  Despite that, this virus may change the lives of pets, particularly dogs and especially those living in apartments.

Preparation for what may happen

Just in case, in the future, you need to go into self-isolation or quarantine now is the time to prepare.  Give up trying to find toilet paper and put your mind to what supplies you will need for your pets if this happens to you.

If you aren’t able to leave your home for a couple of weeks what will your pets need?  Food is obviously number one but what about kitty litter for your cat?  Do you have a supply of flea, tick and heartworm treatment as well as any medication that your pet needs?   And treats!  Don’t forget a supply of treats.  Is your pet’s annual trip to the vet due very soon? Perhaps you should book in now in case you can’t do this at the required time.

Time for “wee wee”

If you live in a home with a yard at least you can take your dog out into your yard so that they can relieve themselves.  However, if you live in an apartment with your dog, how will you deal with their need to “go wee wee”?  Should you have a supply of masks on hand so that you can zip outside to the nearest tree or strip of grass?  Maybe you should stock up on some “pee pads” just in case.

Mental stimulation for dogs

Like people around the world whose lives have suddenly been turned upside down by COVID-19, self-isolation or quarantine may also have a negative effect on your dog.

While many dogs stuck in self-isolation or quarantine with their owners would think it is heaven to have their human to themselves all day and all night some dogs may experience stress or depression.  They may have trouble sleeping or lose their appetite or be listless and reluctant to play.  Or, they may become more destructive, have difficulty settling or start to bark more than usual.

If you are unable to go out for “walkies” it is important to provide your dog with mental stimulation.  Now, while you can, is the time to buy puzzle toys and treat dispensers to help keep them occupied even though they will love having you at home 24/7 with them.

To keep both you and your dog occupied self-isolation could be a good opportunity to do that bit of training you have been meaning to do but haven’t had time.  Here is some information from Cesar Milan on training your dog with the five essential commands.

And for some great information on exercises that will provide mental stimulation for your dog have a look at Cesar Milan’s “how to exercise your dog indoors” with ideas on how to :

  • Set up obstacle courses
  • Make your dog work for their treats
  • Play keep away and fetch
  • Use the treadmill!!
  • Play tug-of-war

We, at “Don’t Fret Pet!”, hope that you and your pets all stay safe and relaxed during the coming difficult months.  If you are stuck and need someone to walk your dog for you search our site for a lovely, verified dog walker who would love to help.

Don't Fret Pet

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